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OPEN HEARTS

We believe that living a life inspired by God’s love compels us to offer help, hope, and healing to those looking for more meaning in their lives.

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OPEN MINDS

We believe God’s grace is available to all people, no matter what.

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OPEN DOORS

We believe in welcoming others into our lives, but also in taking action outside the walls of the church to serve our neighbors, next door and around the world.


Mission, Vision & Organization of New Vision UMC

The Mission of New Vision UMC is to make passionate, committed disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of our Community. This mission statement closely resembles the Great Commission given by Jesus to his disciples in Matthew 16:19.

Our vision is that New Vision UMC is a safe vital Christian Community offering Help, Hope & Healing.

Here is a closer look at how we have organized our church around this mission and vision:

Pray Daily
Relate God’s Work in my Life
Answer His Call
Yield to His Will

We believe that leadership comes not just from our staff, but from everyone affiliated with the church. We also believe that leadership must be accountable. Listed below is the key accountability for key groups within the church:

  • Board of Directors – Governance
  • Pastor – Leading
  • Staff – Managing
  • Members – Ministering

As members of each group pursue their leadership accountability, they should ask themselves these key questions:

  • -How will non-members or the unchurched be included?
  • -How will they experience radical hospitality?
  • -How will they be personally invited to return to another event of activity?

The Breakthrough Board of Directors is responsible for the overall governance of New Vision UMC. The Board meets monthly. For more information on current Board of Directors and recent meeting minutes click here. The Breakthrough leadership governs the church toward three measurable goals:

  1. The number of new Christ followers
  2. The number of Leaders developed
  3. The alignment of resources for Evangelism as we fulfill the “Great Commission”

You can find more information about the Breakthrough Board of Directors and monthly meeting minutes by following this link.

The entire church is involved with the implementation of five prescriptions:

  1. Season of Prayer and Surrender
  2. Leadership Structure Re-alignment
  3. Signature Family/Children’s Ministry
  4. Major Community Outreach Breakthrough Events
  5. Global Mission Initiative

Beliefs of the United Methodist Church

United Methodists share a common heritage with all Christians. According to our foundational statement of beliefs in The Book of Discipline, we share the following basic affirmations in common with all Christian communities:

God
When we say the Apostles’ Creed, we join with millions of Christians through the ages in an understanding of God as a Trinity—three persons in one: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. From early in our Judaic roots we’ve affirmed that God is one and indivisible, yet God is revealed in three distinct ways.

We also try to find adjectives that describe the divine nature: God is transcendent (over and beyond all that is), yet at the same time immanent (present in everything). God is omnipresent (everywhere at once), omnipotent (all-powerful), and omniscient (all-knowing). God is absolute, infinite, righteous, just, loving, merciful…and more.

We cannot describe God with certainty. But we can put into words what God does and how we experience God’s action in our lives. God works in at least these seven ways:

  • God creates. In the beginning God created the universe, and the Creation is ongoing. From the whirling galaxies, to subatomic particles, to the unfathomable wonders of our own minds and bodies—we marvel at God’s creative wisdom.
  • God sustains. God continues to be active in creation, holding all in “the everlasting arms.” In particular, we affirm that God is involved in our human history—past, present, and future.
  • God loves. God loves all creation. In particular, God loves humankind, created in the divine image. This love is like that of a parent. We’ve followed Jesus in speaking of God as “our Father,” while at times it seems that God nurtures us in a motherly way as well.
  • God suffers. Since God is present in creation, God is hurt when any aspect of creation is hurt. God especially suffers when people are injured. In all violence, abuse, injustice, prejudice, hunger, poverty, or illness, the living God is suffering in our midst.
  • God judges. All human behavior is measured by God’s righteous standards—not only the behavior itself but also the motive or the intent. The Lord of life knows our sin—and judges it.
  • God redeems. Out of infinite love for each of us, God forgives our own self-destruction and renews us within. God is reconciling the individuals, groups, races, and nations that have been rent apart. God is redeeming all creation.
  • God reigns. God is the Lord of all creation and of all history. Though it may oftentimes seem that the “principalities and powers” of evil have the stronger hand, we affirm God’s present and future reign.

When all is done, if we have difficulty in imagining who God is or in relating to God, there’s a simple solution: Remember Jesus—for in the New Testament picture of Jesus, we see God.

Jesus
We believe in the mystery of salvation through Jesus Christ. God became human in Jesus of Nazareth; and his life, death and resurrection demonstrates God’s redeeming love.

We proclaim Jesus as our Lord, the one to whom we give our devoted allegiance. The word Lord had a more powerful meaning for people of medieval times, because they actually lived under the authority of lords and monarchs. Today some of us may find it difficult to acknowledge Jesus as Lord of our lives. We’re used to being independent and self-sufficient. We have not bowed down to authority. To claim Jesus as Lord is to freely submit our will to his, to humbly profess that it is he who is in charge of this world.

Perhaps best of all, we believe in Jesus as Savior, as the one through whom God has freed us of our sin and has given us the gift of whole life, eternal life, and salvation.

The Holy Spirit
The Holy Spirit is God’s present activity in our midst. When we sense God’s leading, God’s challenge, or God’s support or comfort, we say that it’s the Holy Spirit at work.

In Hebrew, the words for Spirit, wind, and breath are nearly the same. The same is true in Greek. In trying to describe God’s activity among them, the ancients were saying that it was like God’s breath, like a sacred wind. It could not be seen or held: “The wind blows where it chooses, and you hear the sound of it, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes” (John 3:8). But the effect of God’s Spirit, like the wind, could be felt and known.

As one of our creeds puts it, “We believe in the Holy Spirit, God present with us for guidance, for comfort, and for strength” (The United Methodist Hymnal, No. 884). We sense the Spirit in time alone—perhaps in prayer, in our study of the Scriptures, in reflection on a difficult decision, or in the memory of a loved one. The Spirit’s touch is intensely personal.

How does the Holy Spirit affect our lives? By changing us! By renewing us and by strengthening us for the work of ministry.

  • Fruits: Jesus said, “You will know them by their fruits” (Matthew 7:16). What sort of fruit? Paul asserts that “the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control” (Galatians 5:22).
  • Gifts: Paul also writes that the Spirit bestows spiritual gifts on believers. In 1 Corinthians 12:8-10 he lists nine, which vary from one person to another: the utterance of wisdom, the utterance of knowledge, faith, healing, working of miracles, prophecy, the discernment of spirits, various kinds of tongues, and the interpretation of tongues.

These fruits and gifts are not of our own achievement. They and others are the outgrowth of the Spirit’s work in us, by grace, through our faith in Jesus the Christ.

The Bible
The Bible is a collection of sixty-six books, thirty-nine in the Old Testament (or Hebrew Bible) and twenty-seven in the New Testament. These books were written over a one-thousand-year period in three languages: Hebrew, Aramaic (the language Jesus spoke), and Greek.

The books are of different lengths and different literary styles. In the Hebrew Bible we find legends, histories, liturgies for community worship, songs, proverbs, sermons, even a poetic drama (Job). In the New Testament are Gospels, a history, many letters, and an apocalypse (Revelation). Yet through it all the Bible is the story of the one God, who stands in a covenant relationship with the people of God.

We say that God speaks to us through the Bible, that it’s God’s Word. This authority derives from three sources:

  • We hold that the writers of the Bible were inspired, that they were filled with God’s Spirit as they wrote the truth to the best of their knowledge.
  • We hold that God was at work in the process of canonization, during which only the most faithful and useful books were adopted as Scripture.
  • We hold that the Holy Spirit works today in our thoughtful study of the Scriptures, especially as we study them together, seeking to relate the old words to life’s present realities.

The Bible’s authority is, therefore, nothing magical. For example, we do not open the text at random to discover God’s will. The authority of Scripture derives from the movement of God’s Spirit in times past and in our reading of it today.

Find out more at umc.org.